Radioactive Sulfur Detected in San Diego From Fukushima

The University of California San Diego detected radioactive sulfur on March 28th in La Jolla CA. This spike in radioactive sulfur can be conclusively tied back to the reactor meltdowns at Fukushima.

Over a four-day period ending on March 28, they measured 1,501 atoms of radioactive sulfur in sulfate particles per cubic meter of air, the highest they’ve ever seen in more than two years of recordings at the site.”

The emergency seawater injection done at Fukushima created a unique set of chemical circumstances that created this large volume of radioactive sulfur. Chemists at UCSD, using NOAA air maps were able to back track the readings at La Jolla, account for losses over the ocean trip and come up with a number for the original release in Japan.

“After accounting for losses along the way as the sulfate particles fell into the ocean, decayed, or eddied away from the stream of air heading toward California, the researchers calculated that 400 billion neutrons were released per square meter surface of the cooling pools, between March 13, when the seawater pumping operation began, and March 20, 2011.

Concentrations a kilometer or so above the ocean near Fukushima must have been about 365 times higher than natural levels to account for the levels they observed in California.”

Read the rest of the story at The La Jolla Light

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